The housing affordability crisis is having unintended consequences between generations, according to economist Professor Rachel ViforJ. "There's definitely growing intergenerational tension in the housing market. Most people who are home owners are older and many of them would have bought back in say the 1980s, or the 1990s, just before the worldwide housing boom." "If you bought just before the housing boom, then you would be enjoying a huge amount of capital gain," said Professor ViforJ. Unfortunately, what that means is that it's actually locking out growing numbers of young people from being able to access first home ownership."

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If you have participated in a BBQ with family or friends, property investment can be an uncomfortable topic when it comes to housing affordability. The disparity arises where younger buyers express concern about being ‘priced-out’ of the market because of investor tax incentives. One of those tax incentives is negative gearing, which essentially means any losses a housing investor makes on the shortfall between rent and interest will be offset against other income — and covered by the taxpayer. Speaking of this dynamic, Tim Lawless of CoreLogic said there were some ways to scale it back if any politician is game to try.

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Most people are aware of self-managed super funds (SMSF), yet less familiar with Family Super Funds (FSF). In this article we explore subtle variations between the two and identify how a FSF can be seen to improve family wealth outcomes.Both Fund structures can have up to six members in total. In the case of a SMSF, these Funds do not require any of the parties to be related by blood or legal arrangement (such as

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More of us have been in paid work this past year than ever before. A big part of that is because more of us have been able to work from home than ever before. The proportion of Australians in paid work climbed above 64% in May last year, and has stayed there since. At the same time, unemployment has hovered around a half-century low of 4%. In April last year, female unemployment fell to what

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Australian banks announced big profits over the past several weeks, and have been roundly criticised by many believing the fees charged (including interest rates) are excessive. What is not well known is that banks have passed on only 2.73% of the RBA’s (Reserve Bank of Australia) 4.00% rate increases since early 2022 as at June 2023. This has actually been a cushioning effect for borrowers. Banks have been competing aggressively and on average have not

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